Providing certificates of professional conduct

The College recognizes that registrants may choose to leave British Columbia to practise or undertake formal postgraduate training elsewhere. Registrants are reminded that if they return to BC and wish to resume practising medicine, they must provide the College with a certificate of professional conduct (CPC) from every jurisdiction where they have practised or trained during their absence. Failure to provide a CPC from other jurisdictions contravenes section 25.3 (1) of the Health Professions Act

The mandate of the College is to protect the public. The measures outlined in the Health Professions Act and operationalized by the College work in part to fulfil this mandate so that the College is officially made aware of physician practice or formal postgraduate study issues that could impact public safety. 

In practice, the College requires registrants to provide a certificate of professional conduct from every jurisdiction where they have practised or trained during an absence from British Columbia. However, registrants can order the CPC from the other jurisdiction and start medical practice in BC before the College has received it as long as they advise the College of any potential issues that may have occurred in another jurisdiction, such as being named in a complaint, a coroner’s inquest, a civil law suit, or charged with a criminal or other offence.

Under section 25.3(2) of the Health Professions Act, the Board may waive the requirement of the provision of a CPC by registrants who have been absent from BC and practised in another jurisdiction. In order to qualify for a waiver, registrants must sign undertakings that outline the circumstances under which they must immediately notify this College. Additionally, the undertakings require registrants to provide a certificate of professional conduct annually (by March 31 of each year) in order to be able to practise medicine in this province. 

A CPC is required from all jurisdictions that have a medical regulatory authority. Registrants who have practised in a jurisdiction that does not have a medical regulatory authority, and/or no licensure is required of the physician, must provide the College with a letter from the medical director of the program where they worked or volunteered, or undertook postgraduate training, that indicates whether or not they were in good standing during their practice in that jurisdiction.